Chatham Nursery School Birth to Five 

Child Protection Policy 

This policy should be read alongside Part 1 and Annex A of Keeping Children Safe in Education 2019, and in conjunction with Part 1 of the School Improvement Liverpool Schools Safeguarding Handbook which is made available to all staff and volunteers. 

School Details 

Head teacher: Miss Andrea Connearn Designated Safeguarding Lead: Mrs Julie Marshall Deputy Designated Safeguarding Lead(s): Mrs Rachel Rodick Acting Nursery Manager

Mrs Liz Parsons Picton and Kensington CC Link Governor for Safeguarding: Mrs Meg Buckley Chair of Governors: Ms Angela Glanville Policy Date: 16th October 2019 Policy Status: Statutory Policy Review Cycle: Annual Next Review Date: October 2020

This policy provides guidance to all adults working within the school whether paid or voluntary or directly employed by the school or by a third party.

Our mission is to provide a caring, safe and stimulating environment in which all children and families are welcomed, valued and feel able to contribute. We promote each child’s learning and social development and share achievements with their families so that they can be proud of their child and have high expectations of them” 

  1. Introduction 

Chatham Nursery School Birth to Five and its governing body recognises its duty towards safeguarding and promoting the welfare of children as set out in Section 175/157 of the Education Act 2002.

Our school will prevent and respond to abuse and neglect by ensuring that the ethos and atmosphere of the school is conducive to a safe environment. Pupils and parents/carers will feel supported and able to report safeguarding concerns to any member of staff. Staff will feel they are supported by colleagues and the senior management team, including the governing body, and are able to report and seek advice and guidance on any safeguarding concerns, including those regarding colleagues or themselves. We will protect children at risk of abuse of neglect by having procedures in place that reflect current legislation, guidance and best practice.

As part of our safeguarding ethos, we encourage children to respect the fundamental British values of democracy, the rule of law, individual liberty and mutual respect and tolerance of those with different faiths and beliefs. We will ensure that partisan political views are not promoted in the teaching of any subject in the school and where political issues are brought to the attention of the pupils, reasonably practicable steps will be taken to offer a balanced presentation of opposing views to pupils. We will ensure that reasonable steps are taken to ensure visitors to the school do not share messages with the school community which are contrary to our school ethos and beliefs.

Safeguarding is everybody’s responsibility and, as such, this policy applies to all staff and volunteers working in the school. An allegation, disclosure or suspicion of abuse, or an expression of concern about abuse, could be made to any member of staff, not just those with a teaching or welfare-related role. Similarly, any member of staff may observe or suspect an incident of abuse.

  1. Child Protection Statement 

Safeguarding and promoting the welfare of children is everyone’s responsibility. Everyone who comes into contact with children and their families and carers has a role to play in safeguarding children. In order to fulfil this responsibility effectively, all professionals should make sure their approach is child- centred. This means that they should consider, at all times, what is in the best interests of the child.’ (DFE 2019)

  1. Definitions 

Child: A child includes anyone under the age of 18. The fact that a child has reached 16 years of age, is living independently or is in further education, is a member of the armed forces, is in hospital or in custody in the secure estate, does not change their status or entitlements to services or protection.

Child Protection: Part of safeguarding and promoting welfare. This refers to the activity that is undertaken to protect specific children who are suffering, or are likely to suffer, significant harm.

Where a child is suffering significant harm, or is likely to do so, action should be taken to protect that child

Our school is committed to safeguarding children and promoting children’s welfare and expects all staff, governors, volunteers and visitors to share this commitment and maintain a vigilant and safe environment. Everyone has a responsibility to act, without delay, to protect children by reporting anything that might suggest a child is being abused or neglected. It is our willingness to work safely and challenge inappropriate behaviours that underpins this commitment. The school seeks to work in partnership with families and other agencies to improve the outcomes for children who are vulnerable or in need.

Safeguarding Children: ‘Action should also be taken to promote the welfare of a child in need of additional support, even if they are not suffering harm or are at immediate risk. 

Safeguarding and promoting the welfare of children is defined as protecting children from maltreatment; preventing impairment of children’s health or development; ensuring that children grow up in circumstances consistent with the provision of safe and effective care; and taking action to enable all children to have the best outcomes.’ (DfE 2019)

Abuse: Abuse is a form of maltreatment of a child. Somebody may abuse or neglect a child by inflicting harm, or by failing to act to prevent harm. Children may be abused in a family or in an institutional or community setting by those known to them or, more rarely, by others. Abuse can take place wholly online, or technology may be used to facilitate offline abuse. Children may be abused by an adult or adults, or another child or children.

Physical Abuse: A form of abuse which may involve hitting, shaking, throwing, poisoning, burning or scalding, drowning, suffocating or otherwise causing physical harm to a child. Physical harm may also be caused when a parent or carer fabricates the symptoms of, or deliberately induces, illness in a child.

Emotional Abuse: The persistent emotional maltreatment of a child such as to cause severe and persistent adverse effects on the child’s emotional development. It may involve conveying to a child that they are worthless or unloved, inadequate, or valued only insofar as they meets the needs of another person. It may include not giving the child opportunities to express their views, deliberately silencing them or ‘making fun’ of what they say or how they communicate. It may feature age or developmentally inappropriate expectations being imposed on children. These may include interactions that are beyond a child’s developmental capability, as well as overprotection and limitation of exploration and learning, or preventing the child participating in normal social interaction. It may involve seeing or hearing the ill-treatment of another. It may involve serious bullying (including cyber bullying), causing children frequently to feel frightened or in danger, or the exploitation or corruption of children. Some level of emotional abuse is involved in all types of maltreatment of a child, though it may occur alone

Neglect: The persistent failure to meet a child’s basic physical and/or psychological needs, likely to result in the serious impairment of the child’s health or development. Neglect may occur during pregnancy as a result of maternal substance abuse. Once a child is born, neglect may involve a parent or carer failing to:

  • provide adequate food, clothing and shelter (including exclusion from home or abandonment)
  • protect a child from physical and emotional harm or danger
  • ensure adequate supervision (including the use of inadequate care-givers)
  • ensure access to appropriate medical care or treatment It may also include neglect of, or unresponsiveness to, a child’s basic emotional needs.

Sexual Abuse: Involves forcing or enticing a child or young person to take part in sexual activities, not necessarily involving a high level of violence, whether or not the child is aware of what is happening. The activities may involve physical contact, including assault by penetration (for example, rape or oral sex) or non- penetrative acts such as masturbation, kissing, rubbing and touching outside of clothing. They may also include non-contact activities, such as involving children in looking at, or in the production of, sexual images, watching sexual activities, encouraging children to behave in sexually inappropriate ways, or grooming a child in preparation for abuse Sexual abuse can take place online, and technology can be used to facilitate offline abuse. Sexual abuse is not solely perpetrated by adult males. Women can also commit acts of sexual abuse, as can other children.

Further information regarding the signs and indicators of abuse are set out in the DFE guidance Keeping Children Safe in Education (DfE 2019) and can be found within the School Improvement Liverpool Schools Safeguarding Handbook. This includes amongst others, the definitions and indicators of Child Sexual Exploitation, Child Criminal Exploitation (including County Lines), Serious Violence, Female Genital Mutilation, Forced Marriage, Honour Based Abuse, Peer on Peer abuse, Sexual Violence and Sexual Harassment (including sexting), Vulnerabilities to Extremism and Children Missing Education.

  1. Policy Aims 
  • To ensure school takes appropriate action, in a timely manner, to safeguard and promote the welfare of all children
  • To ensure responsibilities and procedures are fully understood and that everyone can recognise signs and indicators of abuse or neglect and respond to them appropriately.
  • To ensure that the school’s practice meets local and national guidance and all statutory requirements are in place.
  1. Key Principles 
  • The child’s needs and welfare are paramount. All children have a right to be protected from abuse and neglect and have their welfare safeguarded.
  • Keeping Children Safe in Education (DfE 2019) reminds us that all staff should maintain an attitude of “it could happen here” where safeguarding is concerned.
  • Children should be listened to and their views and wishes should inform any assessment and provision for them. Staff should always act in the interests of the child, in order to protect them.
  • The school recognises that scrutiny, challenge and supervision are key to safeguarding children.
  • The school is committed to working with other agencies to provide early help for children before they become at risk of harm or require a ‘child in need’ statutory assessment. ‘Early Help means providing support as soon as a problem emerges, at any point in a child’s life, from the foundation years through to the teenage years.’ (DfE 2019)
  • All staff should be aware of the early help process and understand their role in it. This includes identifying emerging problems, liaising with the designated safeguarding lead, sharing information with other professionals to support early identification and assessment and, in some cases, acting as the lead professional in undertaking an early help assessment.
  • All staff should be aware of the process for making referrals to children’s social care and for statutory assessments under the Children Act 1989, especially section 17 (children in need) and section 47 (a child suffering, or likely to suffer, significant harm) that may follow a referral, along with the role they might be expected to play in such assessments.’ (DFE 2019)
  • All staff have responsibility to report their concerns about a child without delay to the Designated Safeguarding Lead. Whilst the Designated Safeguarding Lead will normally make referrals to Children’s Services, anyone can refer their concerns to children’s social care directly in emergencies or if they feel they need to do so.
  • Everyone has responsibility to escalate their concerns and ‘press for reconsideration’ if they believe a child’s needs remain unmet or if the child is failing to thrive and in need or if the child is at risk of harm. Concerns about a child should always lead to help for a child at some point and the child’s situation should improve.
  • The school will work in partnership with other agencies to promote the welfare of children and protect them from harm, including the need to share information about a child in order to safeguard them. ‘Fears about sharing information cannot be allowed to stand in the way of the need to promote the welfare and protect the safety of children.’ Working Together to Safeguard Children (DfE 2018)
  • The school will work with other agencies to ensure any actions that are part of a multi-agency coordinated plan are completed in a timely way.
  • The school will follow the Local Authority and the Local Safeguarding Children Partnership procedures and provide them with information as required.
  • Staff, children and families will need support following child protection processes being followed.
  • Children have a right to learn ways to keep themselves safe from harm and exploitation.
  1. Legislation and Guidance 

Schools and colleges must have regard for the DfE statutory guidance ‘Keeping Children Safe in Education (DfE 2019). This child protection policy should be read alongside this statutory guidance and all staff must read and understand at least part 1 and annexe A of this guidance. 

Local authorities have a duty to make enquiries under section 47 of the Children Act 1989 if they have reasonable cause to suspect that a child is suffering, or is likely to suffer, significant harm, to enable them to decide whether they should take any action to safeguard and promote the child’s welfare. There may be a need for immediate protection whilst the assessment is carried out.

A ‘child in need’ is defined under the Children Act 1989 as a child who is unlikely to achieve or maintain a satisfactory level of health or development, or their health and development will be significantly impaired, without the provision of services; or a child who is disabled. A social worker will lead and co-ordinate any assessment under section 17 of the Children Act 1989.

Section 175 of the Education Act 2002 places a duty on local authorities (in relation to their education functions, and governing bodies of maintained schools and further education institutions, which include sixth-form colleges) to exercise their functions with a view to safeguarding and promoting the welfare of children who are pupils at a school, or who are students under 18 years of age attending further education institutions. The same duty applies to independent schools (which include Academies and free schools) by virtue of regulations made under section 157 of the same Act.

Working Together to Safeguard Children (DfE 2018) provides additional guidance which makes it clear that protecting children from harm and promoting their welfare depends upon a shared responsibility and effective joint working between different agencies:

In addition, Working Together to Safeguard Children also reinforces the need to take action to provide early help before statutory services are required:

Providing early help is more effective in promoting the welfare of children than reacting later. Early Help means providing support as soon as a problem emerges, at any point in a child’s life, from the foundation years through to the teenage years.’ DFE 2018

Everyone who works with children has a responsibility for keeping them safe. No single practitioner can have a full picture of a child’s needs and circumstances and, if children and families are to receive the right help at the right time, everyone who comes into contact with them has a role to play in identifying concerns, sharing information and taking prompt action. 

The school therefore understands its responsibility to engage with other professionals in Early Help Assessments when a child’s needs according to the Local Safeguarding Children Partnership’s Responding to Need and Level of Needs framework sit below the requirement for a statutory assessment.

The Counter-Terrorism and Security Act 2015 places a duty upon local authorities and educational providers to ‘have due regard to the need to prevent people from being drawn into terrorism’. The DfE has provided statutory guidance for schools and child care providers: ‘The Prevent Duty’ (June 2015). The guidance summarises the requirements of schools and child care providers in terms of four general themes: risk assessment, working in partnership, staff training and IT policies. Our school will ensure that staff are aware of the indicators of extremism and radicalisation and know how to respond in keeping with local and national guidance. Staff will use their judgement in identifying children who might be at risk of radicalisation and act proportionately which may include making a referral via Children’s Services to the Channel programme. Equally children will be made aware of the risks and support available to them. We will ensure that children are safe from terrorist and extremist material when accessing the internet in schools. The Government has developed an ‘educate against hate’ website providing information and resources for schools and parents to support them to recognise and address extremism and radicalisation in young people. Given Liverpool is a priority area, schools can seek additional advice from the Local Authority’s Prevent Coordinator or Local Authority’s Prevent Education Officer (details in School Improvement Liverpool’s Safeguarding Handbook).

‘Section 5B of the Female Genital Mutilation Act 2003 (as inserted by section 74 of the Serious Crime Act 2015) places a statutory duty upon teachers along with regulated health and social care professionals in England and Wales, to report to the police where they discover (either through disclosure by the victim or visual evidence) that FGM appears to have been carried out on a girl under 18. Those failing to report such cases will face disciplinary sanctions. It will be rare for teachers to see visual evidence, and they should not be examining pupils, but the same definition of what is meant by “to discover that an act of FGM appears to have been carried out” is used for all professionals to whom this mandatory reporting duty applies. Information on when and how to make a report can be found at: www.gov.uk/government/publications/mandatory-reporting-of-female-genital-mutilation- procedural-information

Teachers must personally report to the police cases where they discover that an act of FGM appears to have been carried out. Unless the teacher has a good reason not to, they should also still consider and discuss any such case with the school or college’s designated safeguarding lead and involve children’s social care as appropriate. The duty does not apply in relation to at risk or suspected cases (i.e. where the teacher does not discover that an act of FGM appears to have been carried out, either through disclosure by the victim or visual evidence) or in cases where the woman is 18 or over. In these cases, teachers should follow local safeguarding procedures. DFE 2019

The school will also consult the government guidance Multi-agency statutory guidance on female genital mutilation (revised 2016) and will have reference to guidance provided by the National FGM Centre FGM Schools Guidance – National FGM Centre.

In addition, the school recognises the important role schools have in safeguarding children from Forced Marriage. (The Forced Marriage Unit has published Multi-agency guidelines, with pages 32-36 focusing on the role of schools and colleges. School and college staff can contact the Forced Marriage Unit if they need advice or information. Contact: 020 7008 0151 or email: fmu@fco.gov.uk.)

Early years providers have a duty under section 40 of the Childcare Act 2006 to comply with the welfare requirements of the Statutory Framework for the Early Years Foundation Stage.

The Teachers’ Standards (DfE 2013) also requires all teachers to ‘uphold public trust in the profession and maintain high standards of ethics and behaviour, within and outside school, including:

  • treating pupils with dignity, building relationships rooted in mutual respect, and at all times observing proper boundaries appropriate to a teacher’s professional position
  • having regard for the need to safeguard pupils’ well-being, in accordance with statutory provisions
  • showing tolerance of and respect for the rights of others’

In addition, the Sexual Offences Act 2003 makes it clear that all members of staff are in a position of trust and would therefore be committing a criminal offence to have a sexual relationship with a young person below the age of 18, even if that pupil is over the age of consent. In addition, it would be a breach of trust to have a relationship with any school student over the age of 18.

The school and this policy also takes account of additional DFE guidance including: 

  • CSE Definition and guidance for practitioners DFE 2017
  • Criminal Exploitation of children and vulnerable adults: County Lines Guidance DFE 2017
  • Disqualification under the Childcare Act DFE 2006
  • Information sharing: Advice for practitioners providing safeguarding services HMG 2018
  • Sexual violence and sexual harassment between children in schools and colleges DFE 2018
  • The Prevent Duty – Departmental advice for schools and childcare providers DFE 2015
  • How social media is used to encourage travel to Syria and Iraq DFE 2015 (Briefing note for schools)
  • The Ofsted School Inspection Handbook and Ofsted guidance: Inspecting safeguarding in early years, education and skills
  • What to do if you are worried a child is being abused: Advice for practitioners DFE 2015
  • Other DFE statutory guidance including: attendance and children who go missing from home or care which is found here https://www.gov.uk/topic/schools-colleges-childrens- services/safeguarding-children

Additional DFE/Gov guidance can be found here:

https://www.gov.uk/topic/schools-colleges-childrens-services/safeguarding-children

  1. Communicating with parents and visitors 

The school is committed to the principles of Working Together to Safeguard Children which states that a ‘child centred approach is fundamental to safeguarding and promoting the welfare of every child. A child centred approach means keeping the child in focus when making decisions about their lives and working in partnership with them and their families.’

The following statement is provided to parents/carers so they are aware of the school’s responsibilities:

‘The school ensures children learn in a safe, caring and enriching environment. Children are taught how to keep themselves safe, to develop positive and healthy relationships, how to avoid situations where they might be at risk including by being exploited. 

The school also has a statutory responsibility to share any concerns it might have about a child in need of protection with other agencies and in particular police, health and children’s services. Schools are not able to investigate child protection concerns but have a legal duty to refer them. In most instances the school will be able to inform the parents/carers of its need to make a referral. However, sometimes the school can in certain circumstances share information without the consent of the family and may be advised by children’s services or police that the parent/carer cannot be informed whilst they investigate the matter or make enquires. We understand the anxiety parents/carers understandably feel when they are not told about any concerns from the outset. The school follows legislation that aims to act in the interests of the child. 

The school will always seek to work in partnership with parents and other agencies to ensure the best possible outcomes for the child and family’ 

The following notice is made available to all visitors in reception. In addition, all visitors are provided with additional safeguarding guidance.

The names and photographs of the Designated Safeguarding Lead and those who deputise for them are displayed in reception and the staffroom

  1. Roles and responsibilities 

The Head Teacher is: Miss Andrea Connearn The Chair of Governors is: Ms Angela Glanville The Designated Safeguarding Lead for Child Protection is: Mrs Julie Marshall Those trained to provide cover for the role of Designated Safeguarding Lead are: Mrs Rachel Rodick Nursery Manager Mrs Liz Parsons Picton and Kensington CC The nominated Link Safeguarding / Child Protection Governor is: Mrs Meg Buckley The nominated governor for dealing with allegations against the Head Teacher is: Ms Angela Glanville

All staff (and volunteers) should: 

  • Contribute to ensuring students learn in a safe environment.
  • Maintain the belief that ‘it could happen here’.
  • Read and understand as a minimum Part 1 and Annexe A of the DFE (2019) guidance Keeping Children Safe in Education and engage in training which enables them to identify children who may need additional help or who are suffering or likely to suffer significant harm and take appropriate action. Staff should have an understanding of the specific safeguarding issues outlined in part 1 of the DFE (2019) guidance Keeping Children Safe e.g. fabricated or induced illnesses, faith abuse. Staff should be aware that behaviours linked to drug taking, alcohol abuse, truanting and sexting can put children in danger. Staff should be alert to the signs of peer on peer abuse and take appropriate action.
  • Have access to Part 1 of the Schools Safeguarding Handbook which will further support knowledge and understanding of key issues to enable them to identify and respond to children who need additional help. Staff will ensure that they have read and understood this document.
  • Recognise that any child may benefit from early help, but all school and college staff should be particularly alert to the potential need for early help for a child who:

Our school is committed to safeguarding children and promoting children’s welfare and expects all staff, governors, volunteers and visitors to share this commitment and maintain a vigilant and safe environment. Everyone has a responsibility to act without delay to protect children by reporting anything that might suggest a child is being abused or neglected. We would expect you to also report to the headteacher or Designated Safeguarding Lead any behaviours of any adults working in the school that may concern you. By signing our visitors book you are agreeing to follow the school’s safeguarding advice to visitors and where appropriate the code of conduct for staff and volunteers 

– is disabled and has specific additional needs – has special educational needs (whether or not they have a statutory education, health – and care plan) – is a young carer – is showing signs of being drawn in to anti-social or criminal behaviour, including gang – involvement and association with organised crime groups – is frequently missing/goes missing from care or from home – is misusing drugs or alcohol themselves – Is at risk of modern slavery, trafficking or exploitation – is in a family circumstance presenting challenges for the child, such as substance – abuse, adult mental health problems or domestic abuse – has returned home to their family from care – is showing early signs of abuse and/or neglect – is at risk of being radicalised or exploited – is a privately fostered child

  • Report any concerns about a child’s welfare without delay to the Designated Safeguard Lead or Deputy Designated Safeguarding Lead or in their absence a senior member of staff.
  • Ensure that they record their concerns using the school’s agreed reporting procedure :
  • If staff have concerns about a child’s welfare or I child makes a disclosure, staff are to record on an “Incident Log “form and report to and share details with Designated Safeguard Lead. If there are remaining concerns the Safeguard Lead will take appropriate action.
  • If I child comes to school with an injury parents are requested to record an explanation on the “Home Accident form” and share information with the Safeguard Lead. If there are remaining concerns the Safeguard Lead will take appropriate action. Records will note the difference between fact and opinion. The child’s voice will be made clearly evident.
  • Ensure that concerns relating to children remain confidential and are only shared with the appropriate safeguarding staff.
  • Understand that any member of staff can make a referral to children’s services should that be required, informing the Designated Safeguarding Lead of any action taken.
  • Report any concerns without delay about the behaviour of an adult towards a child to the Head Teacher, Designated Safeguarding Lead, Chair of Governors or if required the Local Authority Designated Officer for Allegations against Staff.
  • Understand their responsibility to escalate their concerns and ‘press for reconsideration’ if a child remains at risk or their needs are not met. This includes the understanding that any member of staff can make a referral to Children’s Services if required to do.
  • Teachers and those providing teaching must personally report to the police cases where they discover that an act of FGM appears to have been carried out.
  • Follow the school’s policies including this child protection policy and the school’s code of conduct for adults and the Guidance for Safer Working Practices for Adults Working with Children (2019)
  • Be aware safeguarding issues can manifest themselves via peer on peer abuse.
  • Understand that it may be appropriate to discuss with the Head teacher matters outside of work, which may have implications for the safeguarding of children in the workplace. This includes information about themselves. Staff will ensure that they are aware of the circumstances where this would be applicable.
  • Be aware that behaviour by themselves, those with whom they have a relationship or association, or others in their personal lives (in or out of school or online), may impact on their work with children.
  • Be aware that if their role is within the scope of the Childcare Act 2006 and they commit a relevant offence that would appear on their DBS certificate or they become disqualified under the Childcare Act 2006, then they must inform their head teacher.
  • Be aware that they should inform their head teacher of any cautions, convictions or relevant order accrued during their employment, and/or if they are charged with a criminal offence.
  • Understand that some children, including those with Special Educational Needs or Looked After, may be more vulnerable to abuse. ‘Children with special educational needs (SEN) and disabilities can face additional safeguarding challenges. This can include: 

assumptions that indicators of possible abuse such as behaviour, mood and injury relate 

to the child’s disability without further exploration; children with SEN and disabilities can be disproportionally impacted by things like bullying 

without outwardly showing any signs; and communication barriers and difficulties in overcoming these barriers.’ (DFE 2016) The DFE has provided additional practice guidance ‘Safeguarding Disabled Children’ DFE 2009.

  • Have access to the school’s managing allegations against adults procedures and whistle blowing policy. (The NSPCC whistleblowing helpline is available for staff who do not feel able to raise concerns regarding child protection failures internally. Staff can call: 0800 028 0285 – line is available from 8:00 AM to 8:00 PM, Monday to Friday and Email: help@nspcc.org.uk.)
  • Have access to What to do if you are worried a child is being abused 2015: Advice for practitioners DFE 2015
  • Understand that any indication of failure to follow any of the procedures set out within this policy will led to a formal investigation by the school.

The Governing Body should ensure that: 

  • The school meets the statutory responsibilities set out in Keeping Children Safe in Education (DFE 2019) and Working Together to Safeguard Children (DFE 2018).
  • The school has a strategy for providing early help together with other agencies and supporting children and families by carrying out early help assessments, drawing upon the Local Safeguarding Children Partnership (LSCP) ‘Responding to Needs Framework.’
  • The child protection policy is reviewed at least annually by the full governing body and available to parents, normally via the school’s website.
  • All adults working within the school are aware of the school’s code of conduct and this guidance is in keeping with the Guidance for Safer Working Practices for Adults Working with Children (Safer Recruitment Consortium 2019)
  • The school’s practice is reviewed in line with Local Authority guidance, Local Safeguarding Children Partnership (LSCP) priorities and procedures and any actions identified in the Local Authority 175 Audit are completed.
  • There is a named Designated Safeguarding Lead who is a member of the school leadership team. Governors will ensure that this person has the appropriate status and authority within the school to carry out the duties of the post. They will be given the time, funding, training, resources and support to provide advice and support to other staff on child welfare and child protection matters, to take part in strategy discussions and inter-agency meetings, and/or to support other staff to do so, and to contribute to the assessment of children. There are colleagues trained to provide cover for the role.
  • The school has procedures in keeping with the LSCP for dealing with any allegations made against any adult working within the school.
  • There is a nominated governor, usually the chair, who is the case manager for managing any allegations against the Head Teacher.
  • There is an additional nominated safeguarding governor to liaise with the Designated Safeguarding Lead and champion child protection/safeguarding on behalf of the safeguarding body.
  • The school follows safer recruitment procedures, including the statutory pre-employment checks on all staff working with young people. The Chair of Governors and safeguarding governor together with the headteacher review the school’s single central record.
  • The school itself is a safe environment where the views of children and families are listened to and where children are taught about safeguarding and how to keep themselves safe, including on the internet or when using new technology. Any complaints about services lead to improvements in practice.
  • Ensure the school audits the health and safety of the school environment and any actions arising from the audit are addressed.
  • The school will ensure there are appropriate filters and monitoring systems in place in respect of internet use and encourage safe and responsible use of new technologies.
  • It scrutinises the impact of the school’s training strategy so that all staff, including temporary staff and volunteers, are aware of the school’s child protection procedures. All staff must have child protection training which is regularly updated. The Designated Safeguarding Lead and Deputy Designated Safeguarding Leads undertake training in keeping with statutory training.
  • The governors are given guidance to support them to ensure the school meets its statutory safeguarding requirements.
  • There is effective analysis of safeguarding data including bullying, attendance, exclusions, behaviour logs, pupils taken off roll, the views and progress and participation of vulnerable students.
  • All safeguarding practices are quality assured by the leadership team, including the auditing of safeguarding records and the supervision of the Designated Safeguarding Lead and other members of the safeguarding team.
  • The governing body will appoint an appropriately trained designated teacher to promote the educational achievement of children who are looked after, or have been previously looked after.

Governing bodies are accountable for ensuring the school has effective policies and procedures in place in line with local and national guidance, and for monitoring the school’s compliance with them. Neither the Governing Body nor individual governors have a role in dealing with individual child protection cases or the right to know the detail of cases (except when exercising their disciplinary functions in respect of allegations against a member of staff or investigating a complaint brought to their attention).

The Head Teacher will ensure that: 

  • The Single Central Record is up to date and the safer recruitment practices set out in Keeping Children Safe in Education (DFE 2019) are followed in line with the school’s Safer Recruitment Policy and Procedures. At least one member of every recruitment panel has attended safer recruitment training.
  • Job descriptions and person specifications for all roles make specific reference to child protection and safeguarding.
  • There is a listening culture within the school where both staff and children are able to raise concerns about poor or unsafe practices.
  • Referrals are made to the Disclosure and Barring Service and/or the Teaching Regulation Agency as appropriate.
  • They liaise with the Local Authority Designated Officer where an allegation is made against a member of staff.
  • The Designated Safeguarding Lead has a job description in keeping with the requirements of Keeping Children Safe in Education (DFE, 2019) and that sufficient time, training and support are allocated to this role, including the appointment of colleagues able to deputise for the Designated Safeguarding Lead who have undertaken the same training.
  • The curriculum provides opportunities to help students stay safe especially when on-line. Children should be aware of the support available to them.
  • They quality assure the school’s child protection practices including the auditing of safeguarding records and the supervision of the Designated Safeguarding Lead and other members of the safeguarding team to ensure that actions and decisions are reviewed appropriately and that staff’s emotional needs are met.
  • The school meets its responsibilities under the Prevent Duty including ensuring there are reasonable checks are made on visiting speakers and monitoring and filtering is in place across the school’s IT systems. All staff have had opportunity for Prevent training either through face to face training or access to online resources: https://www.elearning.prevent.homeoffice.gov.uk/edu/screen1.html

The Designated Safeguarding Lead: 

Keeping Children Safe in Education 2019 sets out the broad areas of responsibility for the Designated Safeguarding Lead. These are detailed below.

Manage referrals 

The designated safeguarding lead is expected to:

  • refer cases of suspected abuse to the local authority children’s social care as required;
  • support staff who make referrals to local authority children’s social care;
  • refer cases to the Channel programme where there is a radicalisation concern as required;
  • support staff who make referrals to the Channel programme;
  • refer cases where a person is dismissed or left due to risk/harm to a child to the Disclosure and Barring Service as required; and
  • refer cases where a crime may have been committed to the Police as required.

Work with others 

The designated safeguarding lead is expected to:

  • act as a point of contact with the three safeguarding partners;
  • liaise with the headteacher or principal to inform him or her of issues- especially ongoing enquiries under section 47 of the Children Act 1989 and police investigations;
  • as required, liaise with the “case manager” (as per Part four) and the designated officer(s) at the local authority for child protection concerns in cases which concern a staff member;
  • liaise with staff (especially pastoral support staff, school nurses, IT Technicians, and SENCOs or the named person with oversight for SEN in a college) on matters of safety and safeguarding (including online and digital safety) and when deciding whether to make a referral by liaising with relevant agencies; and
  • act as a source of support, advice and expertise for all staff.

Undertake training 

The designated safeguarding lead (and any deputies) should undergo training to provide them with the knowledge and skills required to carry out the role. This training should be updated at least every two years. The designated safeguarding lead should undertake Prevent awareness training.

In addition to the formal training set out above, their knowledge and skills should be refreshed (this might be via e-bulletins, meeting other designated safeguarding leads, or simply taking time to read and digest safeguarding developments) at regular intervals, as required, and at least annually, to allow them to understand and keep up with any developments relevant to their role so they:

  • understand the assessment process for providing early help and statutory intervention, including local criteria for action and local authority children’s social care referral arrangements.
  • have a working knowledge of how local authorities conduct a child protection case conference and a child protection review conference and be able to attend and contribute to these effectively when required to do so;
  • ensure each member of staff has access to, and understands, the school’s or college’s child protection policy and procedures, especially new and part time staff;
  • are alert to the specific needs of children in need, those with special educational needs and young carers;
  • understand relevant data protection legislation and regulations, especially the Data Protection Act 2018 and the General Data Protection Regulation.
  • understand the importance of information sharing, both within the school and college, and with the three safeguarding partners, other agencies, organisations and practitioners.
  • are able to keep detailed, accurate, secure written records of concerns and referrals;
  • understand and support the school or college with regards to the requirements of the Prevent duty and are able to provide advice and support to staff on protecting children from the risk of radicalisation;
  • are able to understand the unique risks associated with online safety and be confident that they have the relevant knowledge and up to date capability required to keep children safe whilst they are online at school or college;
  • can recognise the additional risks that children with SEN and disabilities (SEND) face online, for example, from online bullying, grooming and radicalisation and are confident they have the capability to support SEND children to stay safe online;
  • obtain access to resources and attend any relevant or refresher training courses; and
  • encourage a culture of listening to children and taking account of their wishes and feelings, among all staff, in any measures the school or college may put in place to protect them.

Raise Awareness 

The designated safeguarding lead should:

  • ensure the school’s or college’s child protection policies are known, understood and used appropriately;
  • ensure the school’s or college’s child protection policy is reviewed annually (as a minimum) and the procedures and implementation are updated and reviewed regularly, and work with governing bodies or proprietors regarding this;
  • ensure the child protection policy is available publicly and parents are aware of the fact that referrals about suspected abuse or neglect may be made and the role of the school or college in this; and
  • link with the safeguarding partner arrangements to make sure staff are aware of any training opportunities and the latest local policies on local safeguarding arrangements.

Child protection file 

Where children leave the school or college the designated safeguarding lead should ensure their child protection file is transferred to the new school or college as soon as possible. This should be transferred separately from the main pupil file, ensuring secure transit, and confirmation of receipt should be obtained. Receiving schools and colleges should ensure key staff such as designated safeguarding leads and SENCOs or the named person with oversight for SEN in colleges, are aware as required.

In addition to the child protection file, the designated safeguarding lead should also consider if it would be appropriate to share any information with the new school or college in advance of a child leaving. For example, information that would allow the new school or college to continue supporting victims of abuse and have that support in place for when the child arrives.

Availability 

During term time the designated safeguarding lead (or a deputy) should always be available (during school or college hours) for staff in the school or college to discuss any safeguarding concerns. Whilst generally speaking the designated safeguarding lead (or deputy) would be expected to be available in person, it is a matter for individual schools and colleges, working with the designated safeguarding lead, to define what “available” means and whether in exceptional circumstances availability via phone and or Skype or other such media is acceptable.

It is a matter for individual schools and colleges and the designated safeguarding lead to arrange adequate and appropriate cover arrangements for any out of hours/out of term activities

According to Local Guidance it is expected that the Head Teacher will be the case manager for any allegations against staff and make referrals to the Disclosure and Barring Service or Teaching Regulation Agency.

In addition to the role outlined in Keeping Children Safe the Designated Safeguarding Lead is also expected to ensure that: 

  • The social worker is notified if a child subject to a child protection plan is absent without explanation.
  • The social worker is informed when a child subject to a child protection plan or a child in need plan moves to a new setting.
  • A training log is kept of all child protection training include the names of those attending. All staff must have regular training and updates.

Chatham Nursery School Birth to Five 

Child Protection Policy 

  • Child protection records are kept securely and separately from the child’s normal file. Records will be transferred and/or retained in keeping with the Local Authority’s and NSPCC guidance.
  • The school attends and contributes to child protection case conferences and child in need meetings, ensuring actions are completed in a timely manner. The school will complete the LSCP agency report ahead of each child protection conference.
  • The school escalates its concerns with other agencies when a child’s needs are not being met following the Local Safeguarding Children Partnership Escalation and Resolution Policy.
  • All members of the safeguarding team have received appropriate training; that all referrals made are quality assured and that regular safeguarding supervision is provided to the safeguarding team to monitor all decisions and action taken and the well-being of each team member.
  • All staff read and understand part 1 and annexe A of the DfE (2019) guidance Keeping Children Safe in Education and make available to them other key documents and guidance.
  • School has an appropriately trained member of staff to in order to fulfil its obligations under Operation Encompass, and that the school’s commitment to Operation Encompass is known throughout the school community via the means of staff training, parental letters, posters and the school website.
  1. Safeguarding Framework 

In addition to this child protection policy the school has procedures or policies in relation to other areas for safeguarding children including as examples:

  • attendance
  • administering medicines
  • behaviour for learning
  • code of conduct for staff, governors and volunteers (guidance on safer working practices)
  • children in care (Looked After Children)
  • clubs, trips, educational visits and extended school activities
  • data protection
  • drug and substance misuse
  • disability objectives and accessibility plan
  • equal opportunities
  • emergency planning
  • evacuation and lock-down procedures
  • first aid
  • intimate care
  • on-line safety
  • risk assessments
  • safe recruitment practices
  • managing allegations against staff and volunteers
  • safeguarding advice for visitors
  • special educational needs and disabilities
  • taking and using photographs
  • whistle-blowing
  1. Training and Induction 

All staff and volunteers working in the school must be given a copy of the Child Protection policy immediately upon starting work at the school as part of their induction. All staff and volunteers working in the school must complete safeguarding training appropriate to their role as part of their induction and at a minimum of annually thereafter. The school draws upon School Improvement Liverpool’s induction template (Schools’ Safeguarding Handbook) to ensure all appropriate policies and guidance are shared.

The Designated Safeguarding Lead and deputies must complete safeguarding training relevant to their role. This level of training must be refreshed at least every two years, with further safeguarding training to be accessed on a minimum of an annual basis as best practice. This is to ensure designated staff have appropriate, up to date knowledge and skills which will enable them to identify concerns and make decisions that support the safety of the school community.

The Governing Body should undergo Safeguarding training specific to their role and responsibilities. The Link Governor for Safeguarding should attend appropriate training to enable them to fulfil the expectations of the role.

All staff have had opportunity for Prevent training either through face to face training or access to online resources: https://www.elearning.prevent.homeoffice.gov.uk/edu/screen1.html

The school will keep a safeguarding training log evidencing the training attended by the different groups of staff/governors.

  1. Procedures for reporting child protection or child welfare concerns: 
  • All members of the school community have a statutory duty to safeguard and promote the welfare of children and young people. Staff and governors should not investigate possible abuse or neglect themselves.
  • School Improvement Liverpool provide an online resource ‘Safeguarding-Mate’ to support colleagues decision making: https://www.schoolimprovementliverpool.co.uk/safeguarding- mate/
  • All concerns should be reported without delay directly to the Designated Safeguarding Lead, Designated Safeguarding Deputies, Head Teacher or any member of the School Leadership Team. This should be followed by a written account of the concerns completed on the school’s agreed Child Protection/Child Welfare Incident Form.
  • Consideration will need to be given to immediately protecting the child and contacting the police and/or ringing for an ambulance if the child is injured.
  • The Designated Safeguarding Lead or Deputy Designated Safeguarding Lead will take immediate action delay and will make a referral to children’s services by telephone if a child is believed to be suffering or likely to suffer significant harm. This referral will always be followed up in writing.
  • Children’s Services contact details are as follows:
  • The Designated Safeguarding Lead or Deputy Designated Safeguarding Lead will follow the LSCP and Local Authority multi-agency procedures and consider the child’s needs alongside the LSCP’s Levels of Needs/Responding to Needs Framework (Threshold document) and consider whether an early help assessment or referral to children’s services is needed.

Liverpool www.liverpoolscb.proceduresonline.com/ Halton www.proceduresonline.com/pancheshire/halton/index.html Knowsley www.knowsleyscb.org.uk/professionals/multi-agency-procedures/ Sefton www.seftonlscb.safeguardingpolicies.org.uk/may-2017/procedures-manual/1-

introductionlevel-of-need St Helens www.sthelensscb.proceduresonline.com/index.htm Warrington www.proceduresonline.com/pancheshire/warrington/index.html Wigan www.wigan.gov.uk/WSCB/index.aspx Wirral www.wirralsafeguarding.co.uk/procedures/

  • The Designated Safeguarding Lead or Deputy is able to refer to an online tool which helps professionals assess a child’s level of need and decide which method of referral they should complete (EHAT or MARF). The online ‘Levels of Need Slider’ tool can be accessed here: https://liverpool.gov.uk/referrals/childrens-social-care-referrals/assess-a-child-s-levels-of-need/
  • Concerns about a child should always lead to help for a child. The school may need to escalate its concerns with Children’s Services to ensure a referral is accepted or work with other agencies to ensure an Early Help Assessment is completed.

Liverpool Careline Hub 0151 233 3700 Halton Social Care Contact Centre 0151 907 8305 (Out of hours 0345 050 0148) Knowsley MASH 0151 443 2600 Sefton 0345 140 0845 (Out of hours 0151 934 3555) St Helens Contact Centre 01744 676 600 Warrington 01925 443322 (Out of hours 01925 444400) Wigan Duty Team 01942 828300 (Emergency out of hours duty 0161 834 2436) Wirral Integrated Front Door 0151 606 2008 (Out of hours 0151 677 6557)

  • The school will always seek to follow the Local Safeguarding Children Partnership procedures which can be found on their website:
  • If school does not receive feedback within one working day regarding the outcome of a referral made to Children’s Services, the Designated Safeguarding Lead will contact Children’s Services immediately to determine the outcome of the referral.

‘School Improvement Liverpool Schools’ Safeguarding Handbook’ and Part 1 of Keeping Children Safe in Education (DFE 2019) provides key flowcharts and guidance to support staff and volunteers’ understanding and decision making. This will support staff to make a referral themselves should that become necessary. The Designated Safeguarding Lead should be informed, as soon as possible, following the need for another member of staff to make a referral.

‘School Improvement Liverpool Schools’ Safeguarding Handbook’ will provide additional guidance about indicators of abuse and harm and how to respond to a disclosure. Guidance is also available on the NSPCC website: https://www.nspcc.org.uk/preventing-abuse/

If a teacher in the course of their work in the profession, discovers that an act of Female Genital Mutilation appears to have been carried out on a girl under the age of 18 the teacher must report this to the police. Keeping Children Safe in Education provides additional guidance.

Concerns that a child is being radicalised should follow the normal safeguarding referral mechanism with an additional Channel or Prevent referral being made to the Local Authority’s Prevent and Channel team. Contact details can be found in the School’s Safeguarding Handbook.

  1. Process to follow if a child makes a disclosure 

If a child makes a disclosure of abuse, staff should:

  • Listen and keep calm. Do not interrupt
  • Not promise the child that they will keep the matter confidential. Explain to the child who they will need to tell and why
  • Observe visible bruises and marks, but should not ask a child to remove or adjust their clothing to view them
  • Keep questions to a minimum as their role is not to investigate. If staff need to ask questions in order to ascertain whether this is a safeguarding concern, they should ensure they are open questions
  • Use the “TED” model for asking open ended questions: “Tell me about that”, “Explain that to me”, “Describe that”
  • Make a record of what has been said immediately afterwards in words used by the child and the member of staff to the best of their memory. Use capital letters for the child’s words to help distinguish between the two.
  • Note anything about the child which is connected i.e. any visible injuries including the position and description, the demeanour of the child i.e. crying, withdrawn etc.
  • Clearly indicate whether fact, opinion or third party information
  • Report the matter immediately to the Designated Safeguarding Lead
  • Seek advice from the Designated Safeguarding Lead if in doubt

Staff should not:

  • Ask leading questions, put words into the child’s mouth or press for details
  • Rush the child
  • Examine the child
  • Investigate
  • Promise confidentiality
  • Summarise or use your own words to describe events
  • Delay sharing the information with the Designated Safeguarding Lead

Further information can be found in part 1 of the School Improvement Liverpool Schools Safeguarding Handbook.

  1. Confidentiality, information sharing, record transfer and record keeping and retention 

The school recognises that all matters relating to child protection are confidential. The Head teacher, Designated Safeguarding Lead and/or Deputy will disclose any information about a child to other members of staff on a ‘need to know basis’ only. Guidance about sharing information can be found in the 2018 document “Information Sharing: Advice for Practitioners providing safeguarding services to children, young people, parents and carers 2018. The school understands the need to keep child protection and safeguarding records securely.

The school will aim to seek consent of parents before sharing information with other agencies, however legislation states that schools and other agencies can share information without the consent of a parent/carer in particular circumstances.

The school pays due regard to the relevant data protection principles which allow us to share personal information, as provided for in the Data Protection Act 2018 and the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). The school is aware of the processing conditions under the Data Protection Act

Staff cannot promise children confidentiality but must always act in the best interests of the child and share disclosures made by the child or others with the Designated Safeguarding Lead. All staff are aware that they have a professional responsibility to share information with other agencies in order to safeguard children.

2018 and the GDPR which allow school to store and share information for safeguarding purposes, including information which is sensitive and personal, and this is treated as ‘special category personal data’. Where school would need to share special category personal data, we are aware that the Data Protection Act 2018 contains ‘safeguarding of children and individuals at risk’ as a processing condition that allows us to share information. This includes allowing school to share information without consent, if it is not possible to gain consent, it cannot be reasonably expected that we can gain consent, or if to gain consent would place a child at risk.

The school will transfer records securely to the next setting and discuss the child’s needs before the child starts at the next setting. The Designated Safeguarding Lead will speak to their counterpart in the school to which the child is transferring in order to ensure that they are aware that the file is to be transferred. Upon confirmation of the child starting on roll the file should be transferred as soon as possible (within 15 schools days), but separately to the main school file. The file should be signed upon receipt, and delivered by hand wherever possible.

The school will retain records in keeping with Local Authority guidance and NSPCC guidelines: https://www.nspcc.org.uk/globalassets/documents/information-service/child-protection-records- retention-and-storage.pdf . This in turn references the Information and Records Management Society (IRMS) Information management toolkit for schools 2019.

School Improvement Liverpool’s Safeguarding Handbook provides further key guidance for transferring records including a ‘Transfer of CP records Template’.

  1. Additional child protection guidance will be provided to all adults working with young 

people which will include: 

  • The school’s child protection policy which includes the role of the Designated Safeguarding Lead
  • Part 1 and Annexe A of Keeping Children Safe in Education (DfE 2019)
  • The School’s Code of Conduct for staff and volunteers
  • The school’s behaviour policy for children
  • Guidance for Safer Working Practices for Adults Working with Children (Safer Recruitment Consortium 2019)
  • A flowchart summarising the child protection procedures
  • Definitions of abuse or neglect and possible indicators
  • Identified groups of children more vulnerable to abuse
  • Specific guidance related to including Female Genital Mutilation, Forced Marriage, Child Exploitation including sexual and criminal, Extremism and Radicalisation, Neglect and online- safety
  • Dealing with allegations against staff and volunteers procedures
  • Whistleblowing procedures
  • ‘What to do if you are worried a child is being abused: Advice for practitioners’ DFE 2015

Other policies that may include the welfare of a child are as following, Attendance Policy, SEND Policy, FGM, Disability.

  1. Managing allegations against staff and volunteers working at the school 

All school staff will be aware of and work within the school’s Code of Conduct and other relevant policies and procedures. The Staff Code of Conduct includes guidance for staff regarding the school expectations of the use of mobile phones, electronic equipment and social media.

All staff and volunteers must report any concerns about a member of staff’s behaviour towards children to the Headteacher who will act as the case manager. Concerns can also be discussed with the Designated Safeguarding Lead. Concerns about the headteacher should be raised with Chair of Governors or nominated governor.

Local Safeguarding Children Partnership multi-agency procedures will be followed in all cases where it is alleged that a member of staff has:

  • behaved in a way that has harmed a child, or may have harmed a child
  • possibly committed a criminal offence against or related to a child
  • behaved towards a child or children in a way that indicates they may pose a risk of harm to children

The school’s managing allegations against staff and volunteers policy and procedures will support everyone to take appropriate action. This includes a flowchart to guide colleagues thinking.

In addition, School Improvement Liverpool provide an online resource ‘Safeguarding-Mate’ to support colleagues decision making: https://www.schoolimprovementliverpool.co.uk/safeguarding-mate/

Concerns can also be taken directly to the Local Authority Designated Officer (L.A.D.O.), if needed, via Children’s Services.

Section 4 of the DFE guidance Keeping Children Safe in Education provides further guidance. In addition to the school’s own procedures, multi-agency procedures can be found on the school’s website.

There are occasions when a person who works with children behaves in a way that is concerning and raises questions about their ability to recognise and take steps to safeguard children in their care that wouldn’t meet the threshold of LADO. As an employer the school has a duty to consider whether the issue indicates that they are unsuitable to continue in their role for the immediate future or indefinitely. These are known as issues of suitability and would be dealt with via the school’s disciplinary procedures. Issues of suitability can include:

  • Where an employee is being investigated for an offence against an adult, or
  • Their behaviour in their personal lives brings into question their suitability to work with children

However if an adult who works with children has involvement from Children’s Services in respect of their own child, or a child that they live with or have contact with, it is the responsibility of Children’s Services to assess the immediate concern and inform the LADO of whether the adult poses a risk to children. Examples of this may include:

  • Allegations of assault, physical or emotional, on their own child or on a child they live with or have contact with
  • Domestic abuse
  • Substance misuse
  • Lives with or is in a relationship with a person who is identified as a risk to children

The situation would meet the threshold of LADO should the child in question be made subject to a Child Protection plan. This is because Children’s Services has determined that the adult presents a risk to the associated child either directly or due to a failure to protect.

  1. Allegations of abuse against another student (peer on peer abuse) 

All concerns must be reported and discussed with the Designated Safeguarding Lead, Deputy Designated Safeguarding Lead or senior member. This is most likely to include, but not limited to: bullying (including cyber bullying), serious violence, gender-based violence/sexual assaults and sexting (youth produced sexual imagery). Staff should recognise that children are capable of abusing their peers. Staff must challenge any form of derogatory and sexualised language or behaviour. Staff should be vigilant to sexualised/aggressive touching/grabbing particularly towards girls. Behaviours by children should never be passed off as ‘banter’ or ‘part of growing up’.

The DFE states ‘peer on peer abuse should be taken as seriously as abuse by adults and should be subject to the same child protection procedures. Professionals should not dismiss abusive behaviour as normal between young people and should not develop high thresholds before taking action.’ 

All staff should ensure that they disclose information about themselves relating to the above to the Head teacher as soon as possible. School will create an environment and culture where staff are supported and empowered to be able to do this.

Children with special educational needs and disabilities are more vulnerable to sexual violence and harassment and staff should be aware that additional barriers can exist when recognising abuse in these children. Children who are LGBT+ or perceived to be, may also be targeted by their peers and harassed or assaulted.

Victims of peer on peer harm will be supported by the school’s pastoral system and referred to specialist agencies including, as examples, ‘CAMHs’, ‘Brook’ and ‘Barnardo’s’. A risk assessment may need to be in place. The school curriculum will support young people to become more resilient to inappropriate behaviours towards them, risk taking behaviours and behaviours that children may be coerced into including ‘sexting’ or ‘initiation/hazing’ behaviours.

Additional guidance is available on the NSPCC website:

https://www.nspcc.org.uk/preventing-abuse/child-abuse-and-neglect/online-abuse/legislation- policy-practice/

  1. On-line safety, data protection and the use of mobile phones and digital photographic 

equipment 

Staff should also report any concerns about sexting (youth produced sexual imagery) to the Designated Safeguarding Lead, Deputy Designated Safeguarding Lead or senior member of staff who will follow the guidance in Sexting in schools and colleges: Responding to incidents and safeguarding young people (UK Council for Child Internet Safety). This document provides clarity as to how staff should respond to these incidents.

The school’s on-line/E-safety/Acceptable Use policy clearly outlines the way in which the school uses technology and the measures in place to ensure safe and responsible use by all. There is a clear code of conduct for staff and volunteers which sets out the use of new technologies, mobile phones and personal photographic equipment around children. The school will consider, in particular, Looked after Children (Children in Care) who might be put at risk by being included in publicity materials or school photographs.

The DFE highlights the risks of new technologies:

The use of technology has become a significant component of many safeguarding issues. Child sexual exploitation; radicalisation; sexual predation- technology often provides the platform that facilitates harm. The breadth of issues classified within online safety is considerable, but can be categorised into three areas of risk: 

  • content: being exposed to illegal, inappropriate or harmful material 
  • contact: being subjected to harmful online interaction with other users 
  • conduct: personal online behaviour that increases the likelihood of, or causes, harm’ 

Staff should bring immediately to the attention of the Headteacher, Designated Safeguarding Lead or senior leadership team any behaviours by adults or children themselves that may be risky or harmful.

  1. Monitoring attendance 

A child missing from an education setting is a potential indicator of abuse or neglect, including exploitation. Local Authority guidance and procedures will be followed for dealing with a child who is missing from education, particularly on repeated occasions. The school will follow the pan-Merseyside missing children protocol. Unauthorised attendance will be closely monitored. In line with the school’s attendance policy, the attendance of children with known welfare and attendance concerns will be monitored closely, particularly those with chronic poor attendance or persistent absentees. Schools should also scrutinise the attendance of off-site provision to ensure children are attending and are safe. Similarly, the attendance of children who are vulnerable or with known welfare and safeguarding concerns such as children who have a child protection plan, a child in need, are Children Looked After and/or SEN will be monitored on a daily and weekly basis.

The child’s social worker will be informed immediately when there are unexplained absences or attendance concerns. It is important that the school’s attendance team, including the EWO, school nurse and Safer Schools Officer, are aware of any safeguarding concerns. It is critical that when a child is not attending school their welfare is confirmed and expected practice would be for an appropriate professional to visit the home and speak to the child alone, particularly if there are any safeguarding concerns. The school will seek to ensure it has at least two emergency contacts for each family and consider what urgent action it may need to take when a vulnerable child and family are not contactable and the child has not attended school. The school will ensure it is aware, in advance, of any difficulties in accessing the premises of a child’s family home.

It is essential that all staff are alert to signs to look out for and the individual triggers to be aware of when considering the risks of potential safeguarding concerns such as travelling to conflict zones, Female Genital Mutilation and forced marriage.

Children Missing Education (C.M.E.) are children of compulsory school age who are not registered pupils at a school and are not receiving suitable education otherwise than at a school. All staff should be aware that children missing education are at significant risk of underachieving, being victims of harm, exploitation or radicalisation, and becoming NEET (not in education, employment or training) later in life. Children going missing can also be an indicator of mental health problems, risk of substance abuse, risk of travelling to conflict zones, risk of female genital mutilation or risk of forced marriage. Effective information sharing between parents, schools and local authorities is critical to ensuring that all children of compulsory school age are safe and receiving suitable education. Maintained schools have a safeguarding duty in respect of their pupils, and as part of this should investigate any unexplained absences. Academies and independent schools have a similar safeguarding duty for their pupils. When a child is deemed to be missing from education, school will make reasonable enquiries to establish the whereabouts of the child jointly with the local authority, before deleting the pupil’s name from the register. Once these enquiries have been undertaken, our school will follow the local protocol for Children Missing Education and make a C.M.E referral to the Local Authority Officer for C.M.E.

  1. Private fostering 

Our school has a mandatory duty to report to the local authority if they believe a child is subject to a private fostering arrangement. (This does not include close family relatives e.g. grandparent, brother, sister, uncle or auntie.) This means making a referral to children’s services. A private fostering arrangement is made without the knowledge of the local authority for the care of a child under the age of 16 years (under 18 for children with disabilities) whereby the child is in the care of someone other than their parent or close relative. Further guidance is available in Keeping Children Safe in Education (DFE, 2019) and in Children Act 1989 private fostering. When a child is privately fostered a social worker must carry out an assessment to ensure the placement is appropriate and consider any support needed.

  1. Safer recruitment 

The school will ensure that all appointments follow its recruitment policy and the guidance set out in Keeping Children Safe in Education (DFE 2019). At least one member of the appointments panel will have undertaken safer recruitment. The school will undertake all the required DFE pre-employments checks and where appropriate will record these checks on the single central record and retain evidence in personnel files. The school will seek written confirmation that third-party organisations including contractor and alternative education providers have undertaken appropriate checks. The school’s Safer Recruitment Policy and Procedures set out the processes in more detail and are drawn from School Improvement Liverpool’s Safeguarding Handbook.

The school is required to inform relevant staff who fall within the scope of Disqualification under the Childcare Act 2006 and establish they are not disqualified. The criteria for disqualification under the 2006 Act and the 2019 Regulations includes inclusion on the Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) Children’s Barred List or committing a relevant offence.

The Children Act 1989, 2004 and Children (Private Arrangements for Fostering) Regulations 2005 set out that Private Fostering occurs when a child under the age of 16 (under 18, if disabled) is provided with care and accommodation by a person who is not a parent, person with parental responsibility for them or a relative in their own home. A child is not privately fostered if the person caring for and accommodating them has done so for less than 28 days and does not intend to do so for longer.

  1. The safeguarding curriculum 

The school will ensure it has a curriculum map which sets out how to help children keep themselves safe from harm. At Chatham Nursery school we have a safeguarding curriculum map which responds to the needs of supporting to children to keep themselves safe from harm in a way which is developmentally appropriate to their need. Children will be provided with age appropriate skills, knowledge and understanding to help them recognise and respond to issues such as consent and healthy relationships. Each half term addresses a specific focus in relation to safeguarding, e-safety and health and safety. We involve parents and carers in the focus areas to enable them to support the strategies at home. Children will also learn about the wider safeguarding curriculum which for children would include road safety, anti-bullying and know how to seek support when needed. The school will ensure the curriculum promotes an understanding of the values needed to live within a democratic society including the rule of law, and individual liberty. It will promote tolerance and respect for all faiths (and those of no faith), races, genders, ages, disability and sexual orientations.

  1. Safeguarding children who attend off-site alternative provision 

When identifying that a child would benefit from attending off site provision, our school will undertake an assessment to determine that this placement is in the best interests of the child. We will ensure that the provision identified is suitable to meet the needs of that child. The school will retain responsibility for the safeguarding of any pupils we place in off-site provision. The school will undertake appropriate quality assurance checks to ensure that it is a safe place for the child to attend. The school will obtain written confirmation from the provider that the appropriate safeguarding checks have been carried out in respect of individuals working at the establishment. The school will have a formal agreement with the alternative provision and parent/carer regarding when the pupil should attend and what procedures that will be followed should the child not attend the placement. The school will ensure it seeks the views of the young people at off-site provision to ensure they feel happy and safe.

  1. Complaints and Whistleblowing 

Complaints about safeguarding should follow the school’s complaints policy.

The school recognises that children cannot be expected to raise concerns in an environment where staff fail to do so.

Whistleblowing regarding the Head teacher should be made to the Chair of the Governing Body, whose contact details should be readily available to staff.

The NSPCC whistleblowing helpline is available for staff who do not feel able to raise concerns regarding child protection failures internally. Staff can call: 0800 028 0285.

  1. Escalation 

Where professional disagreement occurs and the Designated Safeguarding Lead and/or Deputy are unhappy with the actions or decisions of another agency, they will escalate their concern in line with the Local Safeguarding Children Partnership’s formal escalation policy to ensure a timely resolution.

The first step of any escalation process with another agency is to raise any concerns directly with the other professional and their line manager. A professionals meeting is always a positive way of resolving differences and remaining focussed on the outcomes for the child.

  1. Proactive Safeguarding 

Our school recognises that school plays a significant part in the prevention of harm to our children by providing them with opportunities to learn, good lines of communication with trusted adults, supportive peers and an ethos of protection.

Our school recognises that we may provide the only stability in the lives of children who have been abused or who are at risk of harm.

Our school recognises that safeguarding incidents and/or behaviours can be associated with factors outside the school or can occur between children outside the school. All staff, but especially the Designated Safeguarding Lead and deputy should consider the context within which such incidents or behaviours occur. This is known as contextual safeguarding, which means assessments of children should consider whether wider environmental factors are present in a child’s life that are a threat to their safety and/or welfare.

All staff should be aware of their duty to raise concerns, where they exist, which may include the attitude or actions of colleagues. The school’s Whistleblowing Policy is there to support and aid them in these circumstances. The Local Authority also has whistle blowing procedures.

If any member of staff is unhappy with the response they have received in relation to a safeguarding concern they have raised, it is their responsibility to ensure they escalate their concern within the organisation. All members of staff are aware of their responsibility to escalate and refer concerns on to Children’s Services when it is appropriate to do so.

Our school community will:

  • Work to establish and maintain an ethos where children feel secure and are encouraged to talk and are always listened to. This ethos will be modelled and replicated by staff and governors.
  • Promote a caring, safe and positive environment within the school.
  • Ensure that the school site is a safe, secure and welcoming place to learn and grow.
  • Encourage self-esteem and self-assertiveness through the curriculum as well as through personal relationships, whilst not condoning aggression or bullying.
  • Include regular consultation with children e.g. through safety questionnaires, participation in anti-bullying week, etc.
  • Ensure that all children know there is an adult in the school whom they can approach if they are worried or in difficulty.
  • Include safeguarding messages across the full curriculum, including PSHE, to ensure that the children are equipped with the skills they need to recognise risky behaviours, stay safe from harm and to know to whom they should turn for help. In particular this will include [include detail here specific to your school setting] e.g. staying safe online, anti-bullying, e-safety, road safety, pedestrian and cycle training, focused work in Year 6 to prepare for transition to Secondary school and more personal safety/independent travel, issues around consent, sexting, positive mental health, etc.
  • Offer a positive school experience.
  • Ensure all staff are aware of school guidance for their use of mobile technology and have discussed safeguarding issues around the use of mobile technologies and their associated risks
  1. Monitoring and Quality Assurance 

Policies and procedures only remain effective if they are regularly monitored and reviewed to ensure that they are still applicable and relevant. Our school and its governors recognise the importance of monitoring and quality assuring the effectiveness of our child protection policy and the procedures set out within it. The aim of monitoring and evaluating the child protection policy is to learn from practical experience, which will contribute to inform policy reviews and future changes to the policy and procedures. The process of monitoring and quality assurance will help the school and governors to identify the policy strengths and weaknesses, and will help to provide an understanding of the reasons for these, so that decisions can be made to resolve any limitations with immediate effect.

Monitoring and evaluation will be done by checking whether the standards from the child protection policy are implemented and whether safeguards are working and will be undertaken throughout the year by the Designated Safeguarding Lead, the Head teacher and the Chair of Governors. Activities which could form part of the ongoing monitoring of effectiveness could be:

  • Scrutiny of the Single Central Record and personnel files to ensure pre-employment checks are robust and up-to-date, and that job descriptions for new positions include reference to child protection, etc.
  • Confirmation that training has been undertaken according to planned schedule and that all relevant staff and volunteers have participated
  • There is effective analysis of safeguarding data including bullying, attendance, exclusions, behaviour logs, pupils taken off roll, the views and progress and participation of vulnerable students. In particular, the school will monitor the link between attendance and safeguarding and those persistently absent, frequently late, missing school (including part of the school day) or those who suddenly stop attending.
  • Methods such as ‘safeguarding training questionnaires’ used to evidence the effectiveness of staff training
  • Regular meetings with staff, volunteers and children which include the opportunity to discuss safeguarding and child protection, or use of questionnaires to evidence this
  • Safeguarding learning walks designed to evidence and test out key safeguarding standards
  • Adapting and amending the policy and procedures outside of their annual review date to reflect current issues which may have recently arisen in order to ensure that all children are protected at all times.

Our school will also draw upon additional quality assurance activities and templates referenced within the School Improvement Liverpool Schools Safeguarding Handbook e.g. Single Central Record Checklist, Personnel Record Checklist and the Headteacher’s Quality Assurance Checklist

Monitoring and review This policy was agreed and implemented on October 2019 and is due for review October 2020